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Side Event, UN Secretariat, Conf. Rm 11, 6:15 - 7:30 PM

Event Date:
14/02/2017
Official
Indonesia

30 January 2017 - Belitung is a small archipelago situated on the east coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. It comprises one main island and several small islands, and is part of Bangka Belitung I

Official
Cape Verde

Local fishers association develops an underwater tourist trail as a tool for biodiversity conservation and supporting local livelihoods.

Official

'International Waters – Delivering Results' is the fifth in a series of knowledge publications pr

Official
Belize

Belize’s biodiversity is exposed to various direct anthropogenic and natural threats system.

Official

Resource title

Strategies and Approaches for Accelerating and Scaling up SDG14 Implementation

Side Event, UN Secretariat, Conf. Rm 11, 6:15 - 7:30 PM

Hosted by UNDP, in collaboration with the Governments of Sweden and Tonga, Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA), Partnerships for Environmental Management in the Seas of East Asia (PEMSEA), International Commission for the Protection of the Danube River (ICPDR), Marine Research Institute of Colombia (INVEMAR) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

14 February, 2017

Download Programme.pdf (476.44 KB)

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SDG14 is one of the most ambitious of the 17 SDGs particularly in terms of the accelerated time frames for achieving several of the targets. Successful implementation of SDG14 requires replication and rapid scaling up of proven strategic approaches that can deliver on one or more SDG14 targets. Drawing from the UNDP/GEF International Waters and Biodiversity portfolios, this side event will present a series of short ‘case studies’ highlighting such proven approaches that have succeeded in reversing large scale dead zones, moved global tuna stocks towards sustainability, reduced the impacts of shipping on the marine environment, and introduced integrated, ecosystem-based approaches to sustainable ocean and coastal management at both local and multi-country scales. Speakers will highlight the strategic planning and other ocean policy and management tools and methodologies used, lessons learned and opportunities for replication and upscaling.

High Level Panel:

Opening Remarks

  • Peter Thomson, President, United Nations General Assembly
  • Isabella Lovin, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for International Development Cooperation and Climate, Sweden
  • Helen Clark, Administrator, United Nations Development Programme

Keynote

  • Hon. Siaosi 'Ofakivahafolau Sovaleni, Deputy Prime Minister, Tonga, “Tonga’s experience in applying Ridge to Reef approaches that Integrate Water, Land, Forest and Coastal Management to Preserve Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, Improve Climate Resilience, and Sustain Livelihoods” 

The event will be moderated by Haoliang Xu, Assistant Secretary-General and Director, Regional Bureau for Asia and the Pacific, United Nations Development Programme.

Technical Panel:

  • “Reversing large scale hypoxic areas caused by basin-wide nutrient pollution: The Danube/Black Sea story” by Ivan Zavadsky, Executive Secretary, International Commission for the Protection of the Danube River
  • “Integrated Coastal Management as a Tool to Accelerate SDG14 Implementation: PEMSEA experience in East Asia”  by Adrian Ross, Executive Director, PEMSEA
  • “Sustaining the World’s Tuna Stocks: The Pacific Islands Experience” by Tim Adams, Director of Fisheries Management, Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency
  • “Reducing Ocean Acidification and Marine Invasive Species Risk from the Shipping Sector: The Glo-X Approach” by Fredrik Haag, Technical Officer, Marine Environment Division, International Maritime Organization
  • “Colombia’s experience in establishing and sustaining ecologically representative Marine Protected Areas”  by Captain Francisco Arias, Marine Research Institute of Colombia
  • “Large Marine Ecosystems as Management and Governance Frameworks for Transboundary Cooperation on SDG14: Experience of the GEF and UNDP” by Andrew Hudson, Head, Water & Ocean Governance Programme, UNDP, and Laverne Walker, Senior Project Officer, UNDP/GEF Caribbean LME+ Project.

Resource title

Developing Ecotourism in Salamansa

Local fishers association develops an underwater tourist trail as a tool for biodiversity conservation and supporting local livelihoods.

30 January 2017 - Salamansa is a fishing village in Cape Verde with approximately 1,170 inhabitants. It is located north of the island of São Vicente near the city of Mindelo and it is a rural area where half of the population is primarily engaged in artisanal fishing for their livelihoods. The artisanal fishing community includes about 148 fishermen and 10 fish merchants, who also practice other socio-economic activities such as animal husbandry, agriculture (during the rainy season), and small scale trade.

With the aim to create alternative livelihoods, reduce the pressure on the ecosystem and reactivate the first underwater trail for ecotourism, the Associação dos Pescadores de Salamansa received technical and financial support from the GEF Small Grants Programme in Cape Verde in 2010. The construction of the underwater trail in Baía das Gatas was the result of an initial partnership between Worldwide Fund for Nature (WWF) Cape Verde, WWF Germany and the German Agency for Nature Conservation.

The goal of this project was to demonstrate community-based ecotourism as a tool for biodiversity conservation and improvement of local livelihoods using the underwater trail as an example. To operationalize the underwater trail, the association carried out a number of key activities including the development of a marketing strategy to promote the trail, preparation of a code of conduct for its use, and selection and training of key staff to manage the trail.

The second phase of the project involved the establishment of a community-based maintenance and monitoring plan for the underwater trail and an awareness raising campaign within the community about the benefits of the sustainable use of marine resources. Once everything was in place, the trail was opened to the public, excursions were promoted and organized, and the Associação dos Pescadores de Salamansa, established a fund to collect and manage trail admission fees for maintaining the trail.

 Download Full Case Study.pdf (954.22 KB)

Resource title

Community-based Coastal Conservation in Belitung

30 January 2017 - Belitung is a small archipelago situated on the east coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. It comprises one main island and several small islands, and is part of Bangka Belitung I

30 January 2017 - Belitung is a small archipelago situated on the east coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. It comprises one main island and several small islands, and is part of Bangka Belitung Islands Province. Due to its rich deposits of tin, Belitung experienced the development of a massive tin mining business that started in the colonial period around the 1850s. The expansion of mining activities on the island led to rapid environmental degradation, eventually damaging 80% of the mangrove forest in Selat Nasik Coast, and producing negative impacts on the livelihoods of the local fisher folks.

The Belitung Coastal Community Group (BCCG) was established in 1998 with the mission to combat the environmental threats caused by mining activities and to implement sustainable coastal ecosystem management. In particular, BCCG aims to rehabilitate, protect and manage marine and coastal resources, while also reducing poverty and improving the livelihoods of the communities on Belitung Island.

Since 2008, the UNDP implemented GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP) in Indonesia has worked closely with the Belitung Coastal Community Group – BCCG (Kelompok Pemuda Lingkungan Belitung – or KPLB in Bahasa Indonesia), to implement an innovative island conservation model in Tanjung Binga, Belitung Island and Kepayang Island.

At the outset, the project aimed at creating a model for the sustainable management of coral reef ecosystems that would enable the rehabilitation and protection of key natural resources while also reducing poverty and improving the livelihoods of the community in Belitung Island. To achieve this objective, BCCG organized activities to raise awareness in the community about the threats faced by coral reef ecosystems, started a coral reef transplantation programme to improve the quality and variety of coral reef, and conducted participatory education and training in order to implement effective and sustainable coral reef management. BCCG also created a network to support the work of fishers and other key stakeholders engaged in conservation activities. To improve livelihoods and reduce the pressure on the ecosystems, the group also initiated sustainable ornamental fishery and ecotourism activities. This project improved the coral ecosystem, engaged the community in conservation activities and increased the income and quality of life of the local population.

 Download Full Case Study.pdf (634.6 KB)

Resource title

Sustainable Seaweed Production

Belize’s biodiversity is exposed to various direct anthropogenic and natural threats system.

Over the last three decades the forest cover in Belize has decreased steadily due to the expansion of economic activities, such as large-scale agriculture and aquaculture. Rapid and uncontrolled coastal development has resulted in increased habitat loss in the coastal zone. It is estimated that about 75-80% of all coastal land in Belize has been purchased for the development of tourism and residential areas, posing a serious threat to mangroves, coastal wetlands, and other coastal ecosystems (Young, 2008). Overfishing and illegal fishing continue to put stress on the ecosystems.

To reduce fishing pressures in and around the Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System, the UNDP implemented GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP) provided technical

and financial support to the Placencia Producers Cooperative Society Limited (PPCSL), under a special initiative called the Community Management of Protected Areas Conservation (COMPACT) co-financed by the United Nations Foundation. The project introduced local fishers and tour guides to sustainable seaweed production, provided technical assistance, procured necessary materials, and established seaweed farms. The first project focused on the area in Placencia and the second project was implemented to expand the intiative in Gladden Spit and Silk Cayes Marine Reserve.

The local community provided support in ensuring that all activities such as preparation of ropes, buoys, anchors, and the transportation of materials to sites were carried out properly. Community members also participated in focus group meetings and were actively involved in the planting and monitoring of the seaweed farms as well as in seaweed harvesting. As a result of the community involvement, 43 seaweed farms were established, doubling the original 20 seaweed farms envisioned in the two project proposals.

 Download Full Case Study.pdf (603.9 KB)

Resource title

International Waters - Delivering Results

'International Waters – Delivering Results' is the fifth in a series of knowledge publications prepared by the UNDP-supported and GEF-financed International Waters programme that document and highl

ight key results and achievements at the project and portfolio level, comprising four ‘signature’ programme areas:  Large Marine Ecosystems; Lakes, Rivers and Aquifers; Integrated Water Resources and Coastal Area Management; and Global Programmes.